Here’s what looks like Sony’s PS5 DualShock 5 controller design which will come as part of PlayStation 5. Here are the details on it.

A new Sony patent registered with the Japanese Patent Office shows the design of what is likely the PlayStation 5 controller.

The patent, spotted first by VGC on the JPO website, doesn’t explicitly mention the PS5, though the included drawings are immediately recognizable. The images show what looks like a slightly meatier rendition of the PS4’s DualShock 4 controller. The triggers seem to be slightly larger and the grips are more angular, much like those of the Xbox One controller. The marginal changes in design coincide with an earlier report by Wired – having spent some hands-on time with the new controller, the publication confirmed that it looked “an awful lot” like its predecessor.

The most significant changes immediately visible in the new design are the removal of the light bar, the replacement of the Micro USB port with the now prevalent USB-C variant, and the addition of a mic at the bottom of the controller.

Slight cosmetic changes aren’t the only thing that the new controller is bringing to the table, however. Last month, Sony revealed that it would be replacing the old rumble tech with haptic feedback, which will offer improved immersion, allowing players to feel the difference between “crashing into a wall in a race car” and “making a tackle on the football field.” The controller will also feature new “adaptive triggers” that can be programmed to have varying levels of resistance based on the action being performed in games.

The console itself will offer 8K gaming as well as 4K output at 120Hz, powered by an eight-core CPU based on AMD’s new Ryzen line, a Radeon Navi-based custom GPU with support for ray tracing, a new 3D audio experience. It is slated for release at some point leading up to the 2020 holiday season.

(Source: JPO)

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