Posts Tagged ‘CyanogenMod 10’

CyanogenMod 10.1 nightly builds based upon the very latest Android 4.2.2 Jelly Bean can now be installed on your Galaxy S III (GT-i9300). If you own this particular model, and wish to check out the latest nightlies, please check out our step-by-step tutorial after the break.

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Android may never have gained this much popularity as a smartphone and tablet operating system had it not been for a few certain reasons, one of them being the open source nature of the platform and the availability of custom firmware for various devices. You would be aware that Android, at its core, is based on the Android Open Source Project (AOSP). There are now several ROMs out there for a variety of phones and tablets that are rooted directly into the AOSP itself. However, the trendsetter was, and will always be, CyanogenMod.

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In the Android ecosystem, the first ever tablets (other than the first experimental builds like original Galaxy Tab and HTC Flyer) ran on Honeycomb, Android 3.0, which was tailor-made to suit the tablet devices’ larger screens. Unfortunately (or not), Android 3.0 didn’t really see much glory for two reasons. One, it was rather buggy in itself, and two, when Ice Cream Sandwich was released, it unified both tablet and smartphone versions of the Android ecosystem, making it redundant to have a separate OS in the first place. For the same reasons, the said Android version didn’t see much developer love, either.

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CyanogenMod 10.1 is really gaining traction, and in its quest to bring Android 4.2 to as many Android-based devices as possible, has now made nightlies available to the Galaxy S and Galaxy S III. Great news for those in ownership of either Samsung device it most certainly is, although it’s important to note that the nightly builds only cover the AT&T and T-Mobile variants of the S III.

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What’s better than a powerhouse of a tablet that’s running on Android? The same tab running on CyanogenMod 10.1, which entails Android 4.2 goodness for all that support it. Why, you ask me? Because CM 10.1, or any AOSP ROM, for that matter, brings with it a freedom that you are very unlikely to find anywhere else. For most power users of Google’s smartphone and tablet operating system, trying different ROMs is almost a weekly affair, if not more frequent. Following suit, I have tried a lot of ROMs on my Android tablets, from Stock to ROM ports to AOSP builds like CyanogenMod and Android Open Kang Project (AOKP), but I have always kept coming back to CM because of the ‘balance’ that it offers, between features and stability, and because it carries with it a sense of reliability.

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There’s a pretty reasonable and easy to understand explanation for the popularity of AOSP-based Android ROMs like CyanogenMod or AOKP, or even MIUI – these firmware often give you a chance to try out a version of Android that’s either not yet available for your device, or that might not have been official supported by the manufacturer at all. I am rocking unofficial CM 10.1 on my Huawei U9200 just to get a taste of Android 4.2, and had I stuck with the stock operating system that came from the manufacturer, I’d still have been at 4.1 Jelly Bean. This is not just me – a lot of people go for unofficial builds so that they can try out new features and improvements without having to upgrade the device itself. Thus, it makes complete sense that a device like the international Galaxy S III I9300 would receive a CyanogenMod 10.1 build, even if its unofficial.

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One of the biggest freedoms of wielding an Android device is the choice of ROMs that you get. Unlike almost all other smartphone and tablet platforms, having an Android means you do not have to always stick to whatever the manufacturer has packaged with your device in its factory state, and much like a computer, you can choose to have your own OS, some with their own specialties and enhancements, while others built from ground up based on the Android Open Source Project (AOSP). Power users always prefer AOSP ROMs over stock or stock-based offerings, because of the broader freedom of customization and tailoring that they entail. Among those, CyanogenMod needs least of an introduction – the first ever AOSP ROM to hit the Android world has now taken another hatchling under its wings – the mighty droid, Google Nexus 4.

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After a great deal of toil, the CyanogenMod 10 stable ROM has now been made available for those running the LG Optimus Black, along with owners of the Samsung Galaxy S II and Galaxy S III. In addition, those in ownership of the Samsung-made Google Galaxy Nexus, the ASUS-manufactured Nexus 7 slate and the HTC EVO 4G can also join in the fun; more details below.

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It was only yesterday when the Android 4.1.2 update was officially released to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) and began showing up as an over-the-air update to Nexus 7 devices in certain territories. The relatively short timescales involved between then and now hasn’t stopped the guys over at CyanogenMod from working their magic and updating their custom ROM to offer the latest Google update to Android.

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CyanogenMod 10 has been demoed via Google+ quite frequently on a number of devices over the past couple of months, and now the CM10 Team has taken to the Big G’s social network to officially reveal CM10 nightly builds, now available for a handful of devices.

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Whenever we talk about and discuss tablets, we only refer to Apple’s iPad, the Nexus 7 from Google and ASUS, as well as the Kindle Fire and Samsung’s Galaxy Tab range of devices. While they may be the most popular and relevant devices in that category at the current time, we mustn’t forget the tablets which at one time looked like they would make a great impact on the industry.

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The fabulous Nexus 7 has only been released for a very short time and already it has managed to win over most of the doubters with its impressive specification and overall pleasurable user experience. The device itself feels like a premium build product, and the integration of Android 4.1.1 Jelly Bean provides the perfect companion quad-core Tegra 3 processor which Google and ASUS have packed under the hood.

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