Jailbreak update: Yalu iOS 10, iOS 10.1.1 jailbreak is out. It works on iPhone 7, 7 Plus, iPhone 6s, 6s Plus and iPad Pro for now. All other 64-bit devices are currently not supported though support for them will be added in future updates. 32-bit devices such as the iPhone 5, 5c, 4s, 32-bit iPad and iPod touch devices are not supported at all.

To get started with jailbreaking your compatible device on iOS 10.1.1, follow our detailed guides below. We will keep updating this with more guides, tips, fixes etc so keep checking back regularly for updates.

iOS-10-jailbreak

Here’s a look back at how the first iOS 10 jailbreak came into being. If you are an avid jailbreaking fan who keeps up to date with the comings and goings in the jailbreak community, then you will more than likely already be aware that the last version of iOS (before iOS 10) to have a publicly available jailbreak solution released for it was iOS 9.3.3. Owners of Apple’s 64-bit devices running iOS 9.3.3 were, and still are, able to liberate their iPhones and iPads using the semi-untethered Pangu solution. Of course, as we also know, Apple patched the vulnerabilities used in that jailbreak solution with the launch of iOS 9.3.4 and subsequent releases.

Since the release of iOS 9.3.3 Pangu jailbreak back in July this year, there has been no jailbreak available to public. Of course, there has been a lot of firmware updates released by Apple between then and now, and there has been a lot of jailbreak teases here are there by a lot of hackers.

After Apple unveiled and released the first iOS 10 beta at WWDC back in June, well known developer and hacker iH8sn0w was first to demo a jailbreak for it. Later, even Pangu Team joined in the fun by demoing there own version of iOS 10 jailbreak at MOSEC 2016. Luca Tedesco showed of a jailbreak on iOS 10 beta 8 as well. However all these were demoed on beta versions of iOS 10, and it would be reasonable to believe that Apple may have patched up all those vulnerabilities in the final release that these parties were exploiting in the beta releases.

Once final version of iOS 10 was out in the form of iOS 10.0.1 in September, Luca was first to demo a jailbreak for it. He was also the first to jailbreak iPhone 7 running on iOS 10.0.1. But since Luca here was using exploits meant for his private research purposes only, these jailbreaks never saw the light of day for public.

After Apple dropped iOS 10.0.2, followed by 10.0.3, as quick bug fix updates, Zerodium made things interesting by offering $1.5 million bounty for a remote iOS 10 jailbreak.

Towards end of October, Apple released final version of iOS 10.1, bringing some new features, more bug fixes, as well as security patches. A developer who goes by the name of ijapija00 managed to successfully jailbreak iOS 10.1 on iPhone 7. He claimed his jailbreak worked on iOS 10.1.1 as well.

iOS 10.1 was quickly followed by iOS 10.1.1 update. Luca was first to show off iOS 10.1.1 jailbreak on an iPhone 7 using one of his private exploits.

iOS 10.1.1 jailbreak

After rigorous testing, in mid December, Apple dropped iOS 10.2 final version to the public. While iOS 10.2 brought many new features, it also patched a ton of bugs, killing a lot of the exploits which were used by hackers to demo their jailbreaks on initial versions of iOS 10.

Apple’s security document for iOS 10.2 confirmed that the company also patched a Project Zero exploit found by Google team in iOS 10.1.1. Once this was confirmed, one of the hackers from Google’s Chromium team made the exploit public as they no longer needed it. Luca Todesco then took it to himself and packed it into a full iOS 10.1.1 jailbreak solution for public.

Available to download as a beta right now, this jailbreak currently only supports a select number of 64-bit iOS devices and is also of semi-untethered nature. Supported devices and firmware as of right now includes iPhone 7/7 Plus on 10.1 and 10.1.1, iPhone 6s/6s Plus on 10.0.x-10.1.1 and iPad Pro on 10.0.x-10.1.1.

Since Apple is no longer signing iOS 10.1.1, those who updated to iOS 10.2 can no longer downgrade back to iOS 10.1.1 and take advantage of the first ever jailbreak to have released for iOS 10.

For tutorials on how to jailbreak iOS 10.1.1, follow the links at the top of this post.

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