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Earlier, we brought you the ultimate battle of the two most popular smartphone vendors and their flagship devices. Having assessed the iPhone 5 of Apple and Samsung’s Galaxy S III, we found both to be technically advanced, and the differences between the two – such as screen and device size – are only important if one prefers a large display, or a smaller one.

To spice things up a little, we’re now going to pit the iPhone 5 up against another to-be-released beauty – Nokia Lumia 920. Announced last week, it offers a dual-core processor, Windows Phone 8 and a camera which – by the looks of things – will be the best smartphone snapper available on the market.

Yes, it does look a great deal like its predecessor, the Lumia 900 but hey, doesn’t the iPhone 5 as well? Here, we run over the key tech specs, and if you’re in the market for a new smartphone this fall, you’ll certainly want to check out these two:

iPhone 5 vs Lumia 920

iPhone5Lumia920

As you can see, there is once again very little to choose between these very adequately-equipped smartphones. The iPhone 5 offers an Apple A6 processor, which is quite a bump from the Lumia’s dual-core Qualcomm composition, but with both the iPhone 4S and Lumia 900 as smooth as butter on iOS 5.x and Windows Phone 7.x respectively, such features shouldn’t make or break your choice.

Both pack in LTE, and the Lumia has the advantage of packing in NFC – something expected of the iPhone 5 right up until the last moment.

Nokia’s high-end devices have always packed in a decent camera (the N97′s snapper still looks rather good for a device five years of age), and with Apple having already shown us what the Sapphire-encrusted rear-camera can do, both will be perfect for those using Instagram or Flickr on a frequent basis.

Wireless charging offered by Lumia 920 is another plus over iPhone 5 if you are into that sort of thing.

The most decisive segment of the chart has to be the apps section, and for all the promise both Nokia and Windows Phone 8 offers, the success of the device and its platform will rest firmly on getting the developers’ backing. 100,000+ sounds like a lot, but with Apple almost at three quarters of a million now and counting, the Windows Phone Store needs filling up with Apps. Pronto.

In the end, it really comes down to the platform and ecosystem that you want to go with.

Still, of these two very solid devices, which is your winner? Share your sentiments via the usual mediums below.

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