Apple’s new iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus will cost more than the models that they replace, if you happen to live in the wrong country. While Apple has stuck with the same off-contract pricing in the United States when comparing the two new smartphones with the earlier iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus models, those in Canada, Australia and parts of Europe will see their prices increase.

This isn’t the first time that Apple has bumped prices during a hardware revision, and the reason now is the same as it always was – the dollar’s fluctuation against currencies such as the Canadian and Australian dollars as well as the Euro. That means that those in Canada, Australia and some of Europe – Italy, Germany, France and The Netherlands, for example – will be paying more for this year’s phone than last.

It’s not all bad news, though, because those in the UK aren’t affected by the price hike, with Apple sticking with the same pricing structure that saw the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus prove so popular one year ago.

As an example of where the price hike is coming from, an off-contract iPhone 6s Plus in Canada will set buyers back $1029, $1159 and $1289 (CAD) depending on which storage capacity they opt for. Compare that to last year’s iPhone 6 Plus prices of $969, $1099 and $1229 (CAD) and the price hike is a considerable $60 apiece. It’s true that over the life of a two-year contract, that $60 pales in insignificance, but when you’re weighing up an off-contract 16GB iPhone against a 64GB model, that extra $60 can make all the difference.


Similarly, in Australia, the unlocked iPhone 6s Plus will cost 1,229 AUD for the 16GB model, 1,379 AUD for 64GB and 1,529 AUD for the 128GB storage variant while the iPhone 6 Plus was sitting at $1,149, $1,299 and $1,449 before yesterday’s announcement.

Apple isn’t the only company to increase its prices when the dollar fluctuates, but it’s probably one of the most high-profile, and if you live in the wrong country, it’s probably one of the most maddening, too.

Don’t you just love currencies?

(via: MacRumors)

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