Advertisements

The ChevronWP7 Windows Phone 7 unlocking team have announced a new, low cost way for developers to unlock devices in an attempt to remove one of the barriers to entry for independent devs.

ChevronWP7

Homescreen: Omnia 7

As you may remember, one of our goals was to make Windows Phone development more accessible. Plans have recently solidified and we can now reveal a solution we’ve been working on.

In a statement released Friday, the ChevronWP7 team announced that the new Labs will require a small fee to cover costs, but it will still be considerably cheaper than the $99 required to get into Microsoft’s App Hub.

ChevronWP7 Labs

The service will require a small fee — currently via PayPal — to offset costs but we assure you it will be more affordable than the App Hub. Those who wish to write and immediately publish apps are recommended to sign up to the App Hub instead.

Unlocking is required in order for Windows Phone 7 devices to run applications not signed by Microsoft – something developers obviously benefit from because it means they can test their apps before pushing them out to the public.

Worth noting is the fact the new ChevronWP7 Labs is actually in collaboration with Microsoft – a company that in the past has been against the group.

In collaboration with Microsoft, we (the ChevronWP7 team) will be delivering on our goal to make Windows Phone development more accessible by providing an approved device unlocking solution for a small fee.

The original ChevronWP7 unlocking application was pulled at the request of the Redmond outfit after it was discovered that Windows Phone 7 devices ‘phone home’ every two weeks, meaning any illegitimate unlock was temporary at best. After its initial release back in November of 2010, the app was only available for two weeks before it was pulled.

Until now, the only way to side-load apps was to stump up the $99 to register as a developer with Microsoft.

You can follow us on Twitter or join our Facebook fanpage to keep yourself updated on all the latest from Microsoft, Google and Apple.

Advertisements