iOS 9.3’s release represents a fairly significant improvement to the iOS platform. Rather than acting as an evolutionary update that focuses on performance and security enhancements, iOS 9.3 actually introduces a number of new features that take the iOS experience up a gear. One of those features is Night Shift – a feature that shifts the colors of the Retina display to the warmer end of the spectrum based on time and location. But exactly which devices support this new feature?

Those investigating the new inclusions within iOS 9.3 will automatically assume that everything added will be compatible with any iOS device capable of supporting iOS 9. In under normal circumstances that would largely be true, but we have seen Apple introduce functionality in the past that excludes older hardware even though the device is deemed as “compatible” with the firmware. This is one of those instances, with Apple’s new Night Shift feature discriminating against the company’s older, 32-bit CPU-powered devices.

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iOS Devices Compatible with iOS 9.3 Night Shift Feature

  • Sixth-generation iPod touch
  • iPhone 5s
  • iPhone 6
  • iPhone 6 Plus
  • iPhone 6s
  • iPhone 6s Plus
  • iPhone SE
  • iPad Air
  • iPad Air 2
  • iPad mini 2
  • iPad mini 3
  • iPad mini 4
  • 12.9-inch iPad Pro
  • 9.7-inch iPad Pro

That means if you’re an owner of the iPhone 4s, fifth-generation iPod touch, iPhone 5, or one of Apple’s brightly colored iPhone 5c handsets then you won’t be able to take advantage of Night Shift. Those with the original iPad mini or an iPad 2/3/4 are also excluded due to Apple deeming that the hardware simply isn’t capable of handling the feature whilst maintaining important performance parameters.

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Night Shift is definitely one of the more appealing features to be added into iOS 9.3. Certain switched on users have already been experiencing this level of functionality on iOS by using the very popular f.lux app that originally made a name for itself in the jailbreak world. Apple has never officially allowed f.lux to be offered to the mainstream consumer via the App Store, as it alters how the iOS system performs, but has seemingly deemed the functionality good enough to go through the process of implementing it as an official feature of iOS for all the 64-bit devices.

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