Posts Tagged ‘Galaxy Nexus’

Step by step instructions on how to root Android 4.3 Jelly Bean running on Nexus 4, Nexus 7, Nexus 10 and Galaxy Nexus.

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Linux enthusiasts rejoiced at the news that Canonical would be bringing Ubuntu to the mobile realm, and although it was promised a developer preview would be available for the Galaxy Nexus at some point early this year, it now looks as though the Nexus 4 will be joining it. From 21st of February, anybody in ownership of either device will be able to get a first look at the OS, which is set to release at some point in October, and although developers may not be leaping out their seats in excitement, it’s hard not to take at least a fleeting interest in its progress.

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Android 4.2.1 Update is barely out the door, bringing with it all the bug fixes and patches, along with the much-needed and missing “December” from the People app. A new version of Android always means one thing in particular – wait time for a new root method or package for the latest update. Well, thanks to the wonderful developer community that we have all come to trust and love, wait is over, or rather, got over long before you knew it, because Android 4.2.1 is also rootable on all the devices – Nexus 4, Nexus 7, Nexus 10 and Galaxy Nexus – just like its predecessor was. The method has no bells and whistles attached to it, either, and involves flashing a custom recovery and pushing the SU binaries to your device. We’ll guide you how just past the jump.

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It hasn’t been very long since the world saw Android 4.2 Jelly Bean come to light, with all its fancy new feature enhancements, some of which have been welcomed across the globe with great enthusiasm. Whether you’ve tried the latest Android flavor on your device yet or not depends solely on what smartphone or tablet you are carrying, or if you’re using a custom ROM or prefer stock ones, but Google is on a roll already, having let out Android 4.2.1 just a while back, carrying, among various others, a bug fix that’s more obvious than all the others – the missing “December” in the original 4.2 release, which rendered people with birthdays and anniversaries in the last month of the year, well, without a reminder of sorts.

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When Google announced Android 4.2 last month, a lot of people were left unimpressed, mainly because it was an incremental update and not really something that would cause a lot of bells and whistles. Nevertheless, the update did bring a few fresh additions to the Android ecosphere, including the likes of Notification Quick Settings, Gesture typing (trust me, it’s not Swype), Photo Sphere, improvements to Google Now, Miracast support, multiple user accounts for tablets, and more.

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Waiting patiently for the official release of the latest version of Android has never been an easy thing to do. Even when the switch is flipped and the latest variant of Google’s mobile operating system goes live, it still inevitably takes an eternity for it to filter through the approval process of various manufacturers and networks and make it onto existing devices. That is one of the reasons why we often see individual elements ripped right out of new Android versions and packaged up for existing users to flash onto their current installations, which is something that has happened with the core Google apps from Android 4.2 Jelly Bean.

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Yesterday, we showed you how you could implement a feature somewhere representative of Android Jelly Bean (4.2)’s gesture-based keyboard, provided you were running a device on Ice Cream Sandwich or newer. As exciting as that was, it was only a going to be a matter of time before more of the new firmware’s key features and exclusives were ported through to those wielding older devices, and just a day later, here we are with the Android 4.2 camera and gallery, both of which have been successfully ported to a Galaxy Nexus running Jelly Bean 4.1.1.

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The Galaxy Nexus may now be a bit of a relic in comparison to the Galaxy S III and Galaxy Note II, but it still generates quite a bit of discussion amongst Android fans. The recent Jelly Bean 4.1.2 update, which has slowly but surely been trickling through to a large portion of Galaxy Nexus owners, has seen the once Ice Cream Sandwich-inclined smartphone thrust back into the news, and in the latest, those running “takju” iterations of the handset can now get their fill of 4.1.2.

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Over-the-air, or OTA updates make the process of reeling in new features and security patches a great deal easier on mobile device users. The rigmarole of connecting a device to a computer while the magic happened was a common occurrence just a few years ago, but such is the fast-moving nature of the mobile field, that any update can now easily applied with a few simple taps – whether at home or on the fly. For those rocking the Galaxy Nexus or a Nexus S, an airborne bundle of joy is heading your way, and if it hasn’t already reached your device, we’ll show you how to pluck it from the skies.

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It may not have been on the radar that much in the last few weeks due to everything that has been going on with both companies, but the differences that exist between Apple and Samsung relating to various infringements on held patents is still well and truly going on. Although, Apple has largely had the upper-hand in the dispute, a United States Court of Appeals has overturned the preliminary injunction that had earlier been placed on Samsung’s Galaxy Nexus smartphone.

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The smartphone world may be dominated by Android, iOS and Windows Phone at the minute, but it wasn’t always that way. There was a time when webOS was around and was deemed to be probably one of the best and most accomplished mobile operating systems available to users. Unfortunately, those days are long gone, and when HP acquired the software from Palm, its end was somewhat inevitable. Let’s not try to get sad over the long gone days, and all is not lost, since the source code of webOS is now available for all to have and consume.

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A couple of years back, before rooting of an Android device had advanced to the stage it’s at now, many used to pursue the rooting of their handset without unlocking the bootloader. Nowadays, it is generally an accepted prerequisite, but in the early Nexus One era, for example, bootloaders couldn’t be “re-locked” once unlocking had taken place, so alternative methods were frequently sought. If you are in ownership of the Samsung-made Galaxy Nexus, you’ll be pleased to know that now it can also be rooted without the unlocking of the bootloader.

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