If you were blissfully unaware of Brexit, and everything that it entails, including any potentially repercussions that may affect you, then it’s probably time you started taking notice as it’s now starting to have a direct impact on how much your apps cost for your smartphone.

As part of the aftermath of the British public’s decision to leave the European Union, the United Kingdom will be one of the worst hit by the changes with App Store prices rising by more than 25%.

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Apple has already started notifying developers about the changes, referencing those amendments relating to apps sold on the iOS and Mac App Stores. The change affects single app downloads with a one-off sales price, as well as apps which have in-app purchases assigned against them. Although Apple is specifically mentioning apps for iPhone, iPad and Mac, it’s also very likely that the price hikes will also apply to content like TV shows and movies as rented or purchased through the iTunes platform.

Due to regular dollar fluctuations, those who purchase content in the Turkey and India will be affected by the new price hikes as well, with device owners in the United Kingdom being the worst affected with prices rising by approximately 25% or more. A an example, an app sold in the United States for $0.99 would have previously cost £0.79 in the United Kingdom.

With today’s announcements, those prices have essentially reached parity, and will now cost £0.99, which is an increase of around the 25% mark. Those rises will also be in place across all pricing tiers, with a Tier 2 app now costing £1.99 as opposed to £1.49. If you’re in the UK, and interested in purchasing Super Mario Run as an in-app purchase, then you’ll be asked to spend £9.99 instead of £7.99.

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Apple is letting developers know immediately of the changes, but has stipulated that the changes will start rolling out over the next seven days or so, which means consumers will actually start to see the new pricing when they hit the App Store. We brace ourselves for the inevitable backlash about the price rises, but given that Britain voted to leave the EU, and that vote has had adverse affects on the strength of the British Pound, hikes like these are to be expected in all honesty.

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