Apple’s big March 25th media event has been and gone, and we saw just about exactly what we expected. One of those things is a new and updated TV app that will arrive later this year, with the news that it will not only be available for Apple hardware, but also a range of TVs and streaming devices.

Those TVs and streaming devices include names like Fire TV, Roku, Sony, LG, and Samsung but nowhere to be seen was Google nor did we see Android, a platform that makes up for the vast majority of the smartphone market. The move raised some eyebrows as it’s clear Apple isn’t being too precious about keeping the new TV app for itself. But, according to Bloomberg’s Mark Gurman, there may be method to Apple’s perceived madness.

According to the report, Apple is actually taking a leaf out of Netflix’s book, which isn’t a bad place to start. Netflix says that 70% of its subscribers watch their content on a TV, with just 10% on phones and a paltry 5% on tablets. With that in mind, it’s believed that Apple has decided that it can ignore Android for now because it represents a small portion of the streaming market as far as device usage is concerned.

It’s a theory that makes sense, and it’s obvious at this point that Apple is happy to get the TV app into as many non-Apple devices as possible. Although, perhaps, not anything that looks like an iPhone or iPad. We wouldn’t disagree that this makes plenty of sense, and Apple is one for following the numbers, so we’re willing to believe this for now. The TV app looks set to ultimately replace iTunes everywhere, and it’s surely only a matter of time before the iTunes duties on the Mac are taken over by the TV app, too.

Apple will launch the new TV app and the hotly anticipated Apple TV+ streaming service later this year, and we can’t wait to see how that all pans out.

(Source: Bloomberg)

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