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Christmas is always a good time to shift goods online, whether that be as part of something like Black Friday madness or just the good old fashioned gift shopping. Christmas day itself is also a big shopping event with people getting gift cards or, our personal favorites, generic gift tokens in the form of cold hard cash.

According to new figures released by IBM, this year’s Christmas day saw online sales increase by a not inconsiderable 8.3% over the previous year, with over half of all the online shopping being done via a mobile device. The figure, for those who just need to know, is an impressive 57.1%.

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The same stats also show that these online shoppers meant business too, with mobile sales making up just over a third of all Christmas day’s online sales. Things get even more interesting when you look at the devices that people were using to do all that shopping though.

In the United States for example, iOS accounted for an average of $97.28 per order on Christmas day, whereas their Android toting friends spent just $67.40. The obvious answer here is that age-old one that those with iPhones and iPads have more disposable income than those with cheaper Android offerings. We’re not sure we’re willing to go down that particular path while full of turkey, but it’s a link we suspect plenty will be eager to make.

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Another interesting stat to come out of IBM’s numbers is that smartphones far outshone tablets in online traffic this Christmas, accounting for over 40%. Tablets, by comparison, made up just 16%. When you compare those two numbers together, it becomes very clear that people are definitely going truly mobile when it comes to buying things online.

Whether any of this actually means anything useful is anybody’s guess. It is, at the very least, interesting trivia this cold Saturday morning.

(via: VentureBeat)

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