Looks like PlayStation Network, 2K Games and Windows Live accounts have been hacked and it’s gotten every online gamer in a twist.

Accounts being compromised are becoming increasingly common on scale as large as this, with Snapchat photos being leaked, the infamous iCloud hack, along with the latest Dropbox scare, to name a few. The group DerpTrolling has claimed responsibility for the event, but does not plan on using the account details to attack any network.

Internet-busted

According to the group, the purpose of this hack is to serve as a warning to all gaming networks out there to highlight the weaknesses that these systems have, but since the concerned people did not take them seriously, it was decided to take things to the next level.

Well if you want to believe that, but here’s a slight issue; all login details of the leaked accounts have been posted to Pastebin to serve as proof. According to the folks over at Geek, it is being suggested that the data DerpTrolling posted on Pastebin may actually be false, leading many to believe that this could be a monumental bluff. While that still remains to be proven, and we will keep updating you on it, we strongly suggest that you change all your login credentials as soon as possible, and enable two-factor verification where necessary.

DerpTrolling is the very same group that started the DDoS attack on Blizzard’s World of Warcraft servers, resulting in the company releasing a patch just last week. According to DerpTrolling, the group is currently holding about 7 million login details that include accounts from not just 2K Games, Windows Live, PSN, but disturbingly Twitter, Facebook, EA’s Origin service and some 500,000 credit cards.

MacBook Pro

It has been almost 3 years since the ugly and expensive PlayStation Network hack took place, where Sony went rogue in patching up any further vulnerabilities while resetting accounts and extending downtime. All that effort and expense seems to have been wasted, provided that this latest incident turns out to be true. The group has claimed that it currently has around 2,131 PSN accounts that have been made public.

While the claims remain unverifiable for now, it is expected that the companies caught in the middle of this unrest will soon respond with official statements regarding this scare.

Here’s to hoping all that data on Pastebin, is actually false.

(Source: Geek)

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