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Microsoft today has started taking registrations for Windows 8 upgrade program for existing Windows 7 users. The program, which is available in 140 countries, lets you upgrade to Windows 8 Pro for as low as $14.99, provided that you meet the required criteria for the upgrade.

Qualified customers include those who have bought a Windows 7 based PC after June 2nd of this year. So if you happen to be amongst those who have bought a PC with Windows 7 on it between 2nd June 2012 and 31 January 2013, you will need to register for the Windows upgrade offer by navigation to windowsupgradeoffer.com. Last date of registration is set for 28th February 2013, and if you miss this registration date, you will have to pay the full retail price for Windows 8.

W8Upgrade

The offer is for customers (e.g. Home users, students, and enthusiasts) who purchase a qualified PC. A qualified PC is a new PC purchased during the promotional period with a valid Windows 7 OEM Certificate of Authenticity and product key for, and preinstalled with:

  • Windows 7 Home Basic;
  • Windows 7 Home Premium;
  • Windows 7 Professional; or
  • Windows 7 Ultimate.

The promotional price is limited to one upgrade offer per qualified PC purchased, and a maximum limit of five upgrade offers per customer.

In case you don’t already know, if you happen to have bought a Windows 7 PC before June 2nd, 2012, you will be able to get Windows 8 for $39.99 come October 26th. More details on this particular offer can be found here and here.

Windows 8 RTM was announced back on August 1st. Last week, Microsoft made the final RTM bits available to registered developers of both MSDN and TechNet. Students with DreamSpark Premium accounts are scheduled to get their RTM bits on August 25th.

General availability of Windows 8 is set for October 26th.

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