Following a report by Bloomberg yesterday, Apple has today confirmed that it has been contacted by “some government agencies” believed to be the Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission regarding its slowing down of iPhones via a software update in order to prevent unexpected shutdowns.

In response to the questions posed by the two agencies, Apple has released a statement to Axios which again reiterated that it does not slow phones in an attempt to force users to upgrade to newer devices, although that will surely not be enough to convince everyone.

Apple has not confirmed which government agencies have been in touch, but merely said that it had “received questions from some government agencies” and that it is “responding to them”.

“As we told our customers in December, we have never — and would never — do anything to intentionally shorten the life of any Apple product, or degrade the user experience to drive customer upgrades. Our goal has always been to create products that our customers love. Making iPhones last as long as possible is an important part of that.”

Apple continues to offer replacement batteries at a reduced $29, and with iOS reducing the speed of iPhones when poor batteries cannot provide the power required, a replacement should return an older iPhone to its former glory. The offer is currently available to iPhone 6 and new devices, although faulty batteries within warranty periods will obviously continue to be replaced under AppleCare.

Apple has also confirmed that it will offer a toggle to disable throttling as part of new power management options in a beta release of iOS 11.3 next month, although this is not expected to be made available to users until Spring time.

(Source: Axios)

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