Eclipse 4 for iOS 10 has finally been released, brining full system-wide dark mode to jailbroken iPhone devices. Here are the details.

If you are one of the fortunate iPhone, iPad or iPod touch owners who find themselves in a liberated, jailbroken position on iOS 10, then you simply do not have to wait for Apple to officially introduce a system-wide “dark” or “night” mode in iOS thanks to the immediate availability of the aforementioned tweak on Cydia.

Eclipse 4 is the fourth iteration of the Eclipse tweak and is a lightweight package designed to appease those who want to change the color scheme of their device throughout iOS.

There has been a lot of talk recently, as well as leaked screenshots and code snippets, about the potential for Apple to officially introduce a new version of iOS complete with a dark mode which could either be toggled on or off at the user’s discretion, or set to come into play at a specific time at night, similar to how satellite navigation apps change their interface at night.

The Apple TV recently got a snippet of that thanks to the tvOS 10 update, but so far it’s failed to materialize into iOS. Well, thanks to Eclipse 4, iOS device owners can have something very similar and can get rid of that white, clinical look that’s so prominent throughout the iOS interface.

Regular jailbreakers may be familiar with the Eclipse proposition, and rightly so considering it was originally released for iOS 7, and has been updated ever since as Eclipse 2 for iOS 8, Eclipse 3 for iOS 9, and now of course, Eclipse 4 with iOS 10. In addition to being a lightweight package which uses no battery life at all, Eclipse 4 offers some really interesting additions to iOS, such as system-wide colorization allowing different aspects of the system to be personalized from a central configuration panel. There is also an impressive array of settings which can be customized by the user to tailor the experience to his/her needs.

The developer behind Eclipse 4 has also been putting in additional work to ensure that a number of the most popular third-party apps, as available via the iOS App Store, are also supported with this package. There’s also a promise that additional apps will be added on a periodical basis to further extend the Eclipse 4 proposition, and give users additional power over how installed apps look and feel across iOS.

If Apple doesn’t bring it to iOS, then it’s great to see that jailbreak developers are willing to. If you’re a new Eclipse user, you can grab the package for $0.99 from Cydia via the BigBoss repository. Existing Eclipse, Eclipse 2, and Eclipse 3 users can upgrade to the latest version for free.

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